Gear Review: Patagonia Performance Better Sweater

Overview

I’m a sucker for hooded jackets, whether they’re hardshells, softshells, puffies or fleeces. There’s something about them. The ability to snuggle up into their hoods when the wind picks up or the temperature drops is great. Hoods are awesome. However, when you’re wearing multiple layers of clothing (as I always do in the cold months of the year, winter parkas are for suckers) they can get too much in your face – literally.

I have been looking for a great non-hooded fleece midlayer for a while, especially since I purchased a down vest last year. The vest’s collar is so massive and comfortable that wearing a hoodie underneath kind of sucks. I couldn’t find the right one, but with its update to a tried and true classic Patagonia has nailed it. I was looking for something with a classic and casual look, while also being able to perform when moving about. Most knitted fleeces tend to be bulky or lack range of motion. They’re warm, so that’s nice when you’re just hanging about, but when the pace picks up their downsides become annoying. The Patagonia Performance Better Sweater solves that problem by combining fabrics and with a smart cut. I was unable to find that many extensive reviews of this revised classic so I decided to write one myself.

Construction

As can be expected from a reputable brand such as Patagonia, construction is decent throughout. Flatlock seams make sure there is little risk of chafing, the patterning on the stretch side panels ensures great range of motion and the sleeves are patterned in such a way that your jacket will not ride up when sticking your arms above your head. YKK throughout gives the zippers the best possible start in life. No cold wind will creep through the elasticated cuffs on the sleeves and hem, while they are not so tight that they become uncomfortable. All in all this is a well-constructed piece of clothing with attention to detail.

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Features

Compared to the classic Better Sweater (of which I like the look but not the cut and functionality) the most important features are without a doubt the Polartec stretch fleece side panels running from the hem all the way to the sleeve cuffs. This gives the wearer a range of motion unheard of in knitted-surface fleeces. It also ensures that this fleece can be worn tightly over a thin base layer without getting annoying or uncomfortable, making it very well suited for layering. Other than that it is fairly straightforward. Raglan style sleeves ensure further range of motion in the arms. Three mesh-backed pockets can hold essentials or may act as vent ports if you run hot. The collar is lined with microfleece for added comfort against sensitive skin. This fleece has nothing but the essentials and that’s why I like it. There’s only one thing missing although it hasn’t annoyed me so far – a chin guard would have been a nice touch.

 

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Fit

While most knitted-surface fleeces tend to be boxy, this is definitely a slim fitted one, although I admit choosing between a small and medium was a tough one. Seeing as I want to be able to layer it even with cold-winter gear I chose a small. The sleeves are fairly long, so the fit is definitely tuned for an athletic build. If you’re either very muscular or short and stocky this might not be the fleece for you. I’m 1,78m at 71kg and a small is tight but comfortable for me. The sleeves are just about long enough although 1 or 2 extra centimeters wouldn’t have hurt. Obviously I could have gone with a medium but that was too big on the body and too long on the hem when combined with climbing hardshells such as the Arc’teryx Alpha series jackets.

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Usage

This fleece is suitable for a whole range of applications. Want to take a stroll through town? No problem. Want an extra layer of warmth on your summer trek? Check. Do you need to wear something underneath your shell? Yes, sir. Is your synthetic puffy or down vest slightly too cold on its own? It can solve that problem too. Due to its tight fit and stretchy side panels it can perform in a wide variety of circumstances and during various activities. A true all-rounder indeed.

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Pros

Tight fit

Performance cut

Stretch side panels

Flatlock seams

YKK zips

Classic knitted-surface look

Cons

No chin guard

Overall

If you have an athletic build and are looking for a classic-looking performance fleece, then look no further. This is a great layering piece in a variety of circumstances and differing climates. A workhorse you can take trekking, climbing or hiking, but that is still able to look the part when wearing it to the pub at night. Also comes in a hooded version if that’s what you’re looking for.

Further reading

http://eu.patagonia.com/enNL/product/mens-performance-better-sweater-fleece-jacket?p=25955-0

http://www.backcountry.com/patagonia-performance-better-sweater-fleece-jacket-mens?s=a

 

 

My new favorite jacket: Arc’teryx Acto MX Hoodie

Introduction

A little over a year ago one of my coworkers offered to sell one of his jackets to me and, being quite the gearwhore, I almost immediately said yes without giving it much thought. I like dead bird stuff. Don’t we all?

However, there was one not so small thing bugging me about this particular model from the outset: Sleeve length was spot on but the hem width was a little too much (should I do more squats?) Recently though, I bit the bullet and took it to a tailor I knew I could trust. After a bit of an argument – he didn’t particularly like cutting into the taping – he agreed to tailor the hem to my size so I could wear this baby without harsh winds cooling me down. An extra plus is that it looks so much better now!

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So, now that I’ve been wearing this jacket extensively I thought I should give it a proper overview. It’s an old model by now but Arc’teryx offers quite a few jackets which are similar in terms of functionality, fit and style so I thought I’d write one up anyway.

Construction

There are few outdoor brands that rival Arc’teryx in terms of sheer attention to detail and quality control throughout. Flatlocked and taped seams make this jacket look clean on the outside and in, and make it extremely comfortable to wear, with or without pack. The ends on both the sleeves and the bottom of the jacket are finished with a thin line of grey fabric, which seems to be glued on – no stitching visible.

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The face fabric is 100% nylon with a very thin layer of grid fleece on the inside, giving the jacket just a tad of warmth and a high degree of wind resistance and breathability. The fleece’s composition (96% polyester and 4% spandex) gives the jacket its slight stretch. Due to the taped seams it’s tough for chilling winds to creep through – although they don’t make the jacket waterproof or fully windproof. Don’t mistake this for a Gore-Tex jacket! That’s not to say it doesn’t shed water – it’s exceptionally water-resistant. Since picking it up from the tailor I haven’t put on another shell jacket, and I have not been soaked once – and let me tell you that it has seen some rain in that month! This is to be expected: MX stands for Mixed Weather; meaning garments from that range should be able to cope with changing circumstances. Even then, I have never worn a soft-shell more capable of repelling water than this one. And it is still breathable like a fleece!

True to Arc’teryx form, all features and details (more on those later) are carefully designed so they don’t interfere or stand out, making for a clean look and clutter-free jacket.

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Features

This jacket has been designed with climbing and trekking in mind. That means it’s a very clean jacket with only a handful of well-designed features useful for those activities. It’s a short jacket, just barely touching the hips – although it’s slightly longer in the back than at the front. It won’t interfere with a climbing harness or with a rucksack hip-belt, more so due to the fact that it does not have hand pockets. It only has two spacious Napoleon pockets on either side of the main zipper. These will hold your essentials such as maps, compass, GPS devices or gloves and other cold-weather accessories.

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The hood is spacious and adjustable so that it can be made to follow your head movements. The cut is generous enough for a helmet but I’m not a climber myself so I haven’t tried so far. It also has a brim stiff enough to block wind and rain while still providing ample peripheral vision. The drawstrings are minimal, saving weight and clutter.

The zipper pullers are large enough to grab them while wearing thin or waterproof gloves, but I suspect winter gloves and especially mitts might give some problems. Then again, you’d probably be wearing a different coat in such weather conditions.

Fit

The fit can be summarized in one word: generous. Granted, I’m not a big guy but with 1,78m at 70kg the sleeve length is spot on. However, the body size originally was a little… big, hence the trip to the tailor. Now it sits perfectly on my hips with more than enough room to layer up underneath. The shoulder width is still a bit excessive but this also creates freedom of movement and room for layers without becoming annoying in the armpits so I’ll just say it’s a double-edged sword. Luckily, the cut is not annoying while wearing a pack (which I do almost every single day). Sometimes, a generous cut leaves too much excess fabric in the armpits, which bungles up while wearing a backpack or load-bearing equipment. This has not happened so far, which is good.

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Details

As far as functional trekking and outdoor jackets go, this is a very clean and minimalistic one so its details are few but well placed. No Velcro sleeve cuff adjusters here, just a slightly stretchy ending just tight enough to block winds but wide enough for thin gloves when needed. The Napoleon pockets have a mesh inner, so they can double as core ventilation ports when necessary. The main drawstrings of the hood lead to the inside so they don’t clutter the outside of the jacket. Finally, the zipper is designed to allow opening with one hand. That means it doesn’t lock very well in its fully closed position, which is annoying to some but a godsend to others (cyclists and climbers mostly) – don’t be afraid; it doesn’t come down on its own.  

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Usage

Being a shell jacket its primary purpose is to block the elements. It does so very well: it’s extremely resistant to moisture for a non-laminated jacket and it’s a quite capable windblocker. Due to the grid fleece on the inside it is able to give some warmth but don’t expect the world: due to circumstances I have worn this in a stationary position in cold, wet and windy conditions (+/- 5 degrees Celsius, not compensated for wind-chill) with just a tee underneath and it wasn’t pleasant… The upside was that even then I remained dry, meaning it is able to shed water even when worn directly on the skin. I intend to use it quite a bit this year: it has been the only (and I do mean only) shell jacket I’ve worn the last month in extremely varying conditions including quite heavy rain, and it hasn’t let me down once. It positively surprised me on a number of occasions, which is good. Its real test will come later this year, when I intend to go cabin trekking in the Slovenian Alps.

 

Pros

Beautifully simple

Attention to detail

Quite windproof

Extremely water-resistant

Well-placed details

Adjustable and roomy hood

 

Cons

Original fit off for me

No internal drawstring at hem

 

Overall

Overall this is a great jacket with only one major drawback that might not even be an issue for other people – its fit. After a bit of customization it has been greatly improved and now it’s one of my favorite jackets. Even more than my Fjällräven Keb Jacket it’s a jacket suitable for almost any situation and weather condition. Its water-repellent ability is the best I’ve ever seen in a non-waterproof jacket, and due to the taping the seams don’t diminish that. It has a nice clean look, which delivers on the streets as well as in the mountains. Thanks to a minimal amount of very well placed and thought-out details it performs extremely well without a large amount of clutter.

 

Further reading

www.arcteryx.com

http://www.backcountry.com/arcteryx-acto-mx-hooded-fleece-jacket-mens

http://thegemsstock.com/arcteryx-acto-mx-hoody-review